Tales from the Checkstand: Contact

A couple of weeks ago, a customer came through my line who left a lasting impression. An older woman, very short, a little taller than the height of the credit card machine on the platform in front of the register, so 4-foot-something. White hair loosely tied up in a bun, toting a granny cart.

Her eyes downcast, she was quiet and withdrawn. I recognized the signs immediately: she was avoiding eye contact and discouraging interaction. As I attempted to greet her, she waved me off, indicating what I suspected, that she is deaf.
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Tales from the Checkstand: Feelings

A man approaches with a striking arrangement of perfect roses in a very pretty and unique vase from our Floral Department. He’s a well-built stocky guy: short, blond, well-groomed, tight t-shirt, bulging muscles. Kind of a classic gym bunny look.

He places the flowers and a box of Fran’s salted caramels down in front of me with sort of a grim look on his face; almost a frown.
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Tales from the Checkstand: Lemonade

On the first or second day of a 3-4 day forecasted heatwave, with temps expected to rise as high as the mid-90s, two young gentlemen, 12-ish in age, approach my checkstand carrying two YUUUUGE bags of large lemons (32 @ PLU4053), a 5-pound sack of sugar, and a bag of ice (PLU804).

As I’m ringing them up, I look them over and remember the heatwave happening outside; I decide I must have a couple of budding entrepreneurs in front of me.
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One Square Mile: Southtown’s Diversity, Culture Featured on PBS

“There are 268,000 square miles in Texas. Each one tells a different story.” So begins One Square Mile: Texas, a documentary series billed as “a microcosm of Texan life and culture,” that recently began airing on Texas Public Television stations.
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Profile: Ronit Bryant

I recently ran into Mayor Ronit Bryant at Le Boulanger and spent a little while chatting over coffee. Mayor Bryant moved to Old Mountain View in 1987, having convinced her husband Cliff that downtown Mountain View was the place to be. The couple had spent time living in Sunnyvale and elsewhere in Mountain View, but really wanted to be downtown, to be able to walk to get a cup of coffee, or to the library, or to a favorite restaurant for a meal. This meant moving into a home that was smaller than the one they left, but the trade-off was worth it for them.
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Profile: Margaret Abe-Koga

I met City Councilmember Margaret Abe-Koga—who served as Mayor last year—at Savvy Cellar on a recent Sunday afternoon to chat about her public service to the citizens of Mountain View. Margaret moved to Old Mountain View from Rex Manor in 2003. “My parents were having health issues and we needed room to move them in with us.” Margaret and her husband ended up purchasing a home with a “granny flat” for her parents. Their two daughters attend Stevenson PACT; one in the first grade and one in the fourth.
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Playing Host to Flat Stanley

Flat Stanley is a storybook character popular among second graders. As the story begins, he is a real boy who is later flattened by a falling bulletin board. Stanley learns that life in two dimensions has its advantages, such as being able to slide under closed doors, into sewer grates, and traveling by mail.
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